How to Write Catchy Email Subject Lines: Tips & Tricks

Emails aren’t often the most eye-catching form of digital marketing, but a catchy email subject line is guaranteed to get some attention. If your email marketing strategy doesn’t seem to be getting many clicks, you may want to double-check your subject lines. Being the first thing your email subscribers will see, you won’t want to skip out on coming up with a clever and intriguing email subject line. 

Want to see more clicks from your email marketing campaign? Here’s how to write a catchy email subject line. #ITVibes Click To Tweet

What Kind of Email Subject Line Brings Higher Open Rates?

If you’re a content marketer using email marketing as a form of reaching your audience, it’s crucial to have a great subject line. You can see your email open rates soar by applying to time, the right amount of text, and tricks to grab the reader’s attention. 

  1. Get to the Point
  2. Let Them Know What’s Inside
  3. Timing it Right
  4. Create a Sense of Urgency
  5. Don’t Use ALL CAPS or Exclamation Points!!!

1) Get to the Point

Everyone knows that promotional emails are annoying, which is why you want to send an email with the best intentions. It’s easy to skip over an email on mobile devices after reading the first 3 or 4 words. Sometimes because it’s a repetitive one they’ve been receiving for a while, but usually people are turned away by subject lines starting with “Monthly Newsletter of Your Favorite One-Stop-Shop…”, it’s just too generalized to bring in high conversion rates. 

2) Let Them Know What’s Inside

Personal emails are opened because they’re personal to the reader, whereas marketing emails aren’t likely to be opened unless they apply to the person on the email list. Let your subscribers know what’s inside as they see it in their inbox. If you’re having a sale and want them to follow the link to your website (and hopefully, to shop), an example would be “Here’s a Free Gift for Shopping with Us! 50% Off Online–Get Black Friday Deals Now.”  

Pro Tip: Check the Promotions tab of your Gmail account for an idea of which email subject lines catch your attention, and what you should avoid.

3) Timing it Right

You don’t want your promotional email to be pushed down the list by the time your recipient checks their inbox. Try to schedule your emails to be sent during peak times by using A/B testing. Find out when your target audience typically opens your emails, which days of the week and at what time of day. With this in mind, cater your subject line to the date and time the email will be sent out. 

4) Create a Sense of Urgency

You want your email recipient to know that they need to act on your offer before they don’t have the offer anymore. This is called a call to action–getting the reader to “act now” as the offer is available for a “limited time only”. Try a solid call to action in the subject line to improve click-through rates. An example would be “All Jeans 50%-75% Off! Offer ends Cyber Monday.”

5) Don’t Use ALL CAPS or Exclamation Points!!!

No one likes to be yelled at, even over an email. WHEN YOU USE ALL CAPS in your email subject line, it seems demanding and needy to the viewer. The overuse of exclamation points is too flashy and doesn’t seem very professional. Stick to correct grammar with just the right use of punctuation, as you would in a blog post. 

Best Practices for Writing Email Subject Lines

When in doubt, stick to your SEO keywords for creating a subject line in your next promotional email. Try these practices with your email marketing campaign as a surefire way to get more clicks and higher conversion rates. 

Need more email marketing tips and tricks? Join the conversation to learn more from the ITVibes digital marketing team!

Alanah Beebee

Alanah Beebee is a Web Content Writer at ITVibes, Inc. She received her B.A. in Mass Communication from Sam Houston State University with an emphasis in film. Alanah found her love for writing throughout her years in college writing essays and research papers, and outside of school while writing film scripts, short stories, and song lyrics. Outside of writing, she enjoys playing guitar, filming and editing YouTube videos, and making polymer clay sculptures.